landing

pattern

Your ideal pattern for landing ...

Prior to boarding the aircraft before each jump, you should plan your landing pattern using an aerial photograph, diagram, map or model of the drop zone, by working backward, from the target

up ...

● Determine the current speed and direction of the wind. In no-wind conditions or light-and-variable winds, choose a predetermined landing direction and base the landing pattern on that plan.

● Locate the intended target and determine the wind line, which is an imaginary line going through the target indicating the direction of the wind.

● Choose a point on the ground downwind and on the wind line where you will start your final approach at 300 feet. This spot is your final approach checkpoint.

● Choose the point where you will start your base leg at 600 feet, your base leg checkpoint.

● Choose the point where you will start your downwind leg at 1,000 feet, your downwind checkpoint.

● Determine the shape and location of the holding area; this is ideally where you should be when the canopy opens, and where you should remain for most of the canopy flight.

When in flight, you start in the

holding area

checking your altimeter to time your arrival at the

downwind checkpoint at 1,000 feet

base leg checkpoint at 600 feet

final approach checkpoint at 300 feet.

1,000 feet

scroll

downwind

600 feet

base leg

final approach

300 feet

WATCH IT IN ACTION ...

Each jumper is responsible for landing safely in a clear area. Prior to boarding the aircraft before each jump, you should plan your landing pattern using an aerial photograph, diagram, map, or model of the drop zone. Whether you land in the intended landing area or an alternate one, you should be prepared to make your own correct decisions and land safely without assistance.

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